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. . . . . . The name Fraktur comes from the Latin fractus, meaning "broken." Like Textura and Schwabacher before it, Fraktur is a Blackletter typeface — or a gebrochene Schrift in German, which means "broken font." This is a typeface where the bends of the letters are angular or "broken," as abrupt changes in stroke direction make the letters look quite harsh. .

Fraktur is the typeface (or font) used in German printed publications prior to the 1940s. If you find newspaper articles in the United States from the 1800s and early 1900s, you are likely reading the Fraktur version of German. . Fraktur is the typeface (or font) used in German printed publications prior to the 1940s. If you find newspaper articles in the United States from the 1800s and early 1900s, you are likely reading the Fraktur version of German. . . . . Creating Documents in Fraktur. The instructions below were written by a student in German 101 in Winter 2011. If you'd like to create a document in Fraktur (for fun - this is not something anyone will ever require you to do!), but you find the instructions too difficult to follow, just get a friend who is more comfortable with computers to help you - s/he should find these instructions simple.

. . The German fraktur alphabet consists of 26 upper case characters, with the addition of three vowels with Umlauts: Ä, Ö, and German language, alphabets and pronunciation Fraktur Fraktur was used for printed and written German from the 16th century until 1940. The name Fraktur comes from Latin and means "fractured" or "broken script". . . . The Fraktur font you have most likely seen most often is the Walbaum font common in the 19th century -- basically the Times New Roman of Fraktur -- although it's very similar to the Breitkopf font which is about 100 years older. Simply forcing your browser to display Fraktur won't help a lot. German countries clung to the Fraktur fonts for much longer. But not completely In those documents the German words often were printed in Fraktur while "foreign (based) words" (in Latin, French, English, etc.) were printed in Antiqua - within the same sentence. A lot of the official texts were interspersed with French and Latin legal.

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